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Peer-Reviewed Critical Care Nursing Journal

Identifying Opportunities for Antimicrobial Stewardship in a Tertiary Intensive Care Unit: A Qualitative Study

Abstract

Background: Antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) encompasses numerous interventions that seek to improve antimicrobial usage, as inappropriate use of antimicrobials may result in the promotion of antimicrobial resistance, patient harm, and increased costs. AMS is of particular interest in intensive care units (ICUs) where antimicrobial use is extensive. Few qualitative studies have sought to identify the perceived attitudes and beliefs of intensive care clinicians around AMS.

Objectives: To understand ICU nursing and physician priorities and preferences around AMS and possible AMS interventions for implementation in the ICU.

Unsettling the “I do not see colour” Ideology in Nursing

As a woman of colour, I have often heard the phrase “I do not see colour because we are all the same” from nursing professors, colleagues, and students. While I used to agree with this statement, I now realize how subtle biases impact patient care when nurses are socialized into thinking we are neutral caregivers. My colour-blind perspectives were well-intentioned at the time. However, as a nurse educator, I see how neutrality in nursing education obscures how racism contributes to health disparities,

A Feminist Perspective on Post-Pandemic Burnout in Critical Care Nurses

Historically, nursing has been a gendered profession. Still today, women dominate the nursing landscape. In 2019, the Canadian Nurses Association reported that 91% of Registered Nurses were female in Canada (Canadian Nurses Association, 2019, p.1). Given this strong female presence, it is disconcerting that nursing remains inequitable for women in 2023. Feminist theory explores the importance of women’s perspectives, social justice, and feminist values, providing the theoretical and philosophical groundwork for the progression of gender equality (Im &

Debriefing and Reflective Interventions to Address Moral Distress: A Narrative Review

Abstract

Moral distress is a common phenomenon found in all areas of nursing practice with a high prevalence in specialties such as critical care nursing. The under management of moral distress is associated with the development of burnout, issues with nursing turnover, and patient safety concerns. Identification of effective interventions to address moral distress remains a novel topic of investigation. The aim of this project was to explore the use of debriefings and reflective practices to address and alleviate moral distress.

Improving Family Communication in Critical Care

Abstract

Communication with family members in critical care is challenged by socioeconomic, environmental, and organizational factors. Ineffective communication between health care providers and family members results in psychological distress and anxiety among family members and can lead to misunderstanding of the patient’s condition and ineffective decision-making. This manuscript aims to explore barriers to effective communication, understand standardized communication tools, and support their implementation in critical care. An extensive search of various databases provided a variety of articles meeting the criteria of communication barriers in critical care,

A rapid realist review of practices for assigning remote telemetry responsibilities to new critical care nurses

Abstract

Background: Registered nurses in critical care units may have a variety of responsibilities in addition to direct patient care. Assuming roles over and above their patient assignment can be challenging for nurses new to critical care. Even though additional roles may include similar skill sets (e.g., electrocardiography), the demands of learning multiple new roles and responsibilities occur during a larger transition into specialty practice.

Aim: To identify and summarize literature that helps provide guidance and best-practice(s) regarding assigning telemetry to new critical care nurses.

Antecedents of burnout and turnover intentions during the COVID-19 pandemic in critical care nurses: A mediation study

Abstract

Background: Nurses working in critical care environments have experienced a great deal of psychological stress during the successive waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. Identifying factors which contribute to burnout and turnover intentions are important to retain intensive care unit (ICU) nurses.

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify factors that are directly and indirectly associated with burnout and turnover intentions in ICU nurses.

Methods: A cross-sectional design was used with survey data during the peak of the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Identifying Serotonin Syndrome in the ICU: Case Report

Abstract

An 18-year-old female who presented with altered level of consciousness, myoclonus, and hemodynamic instability was admitted to the intensive care unit with suspected serotonin syndrome. Serotonin syndrome is an under-recognized disorder that can cause altered levels of consciousness, neuromuscular and autonomic dysfunction, and even death. Increasing critical care nurses’ and multidisciplinary team members’ awareness of serotonin syndrome will lead to more timely identification, avoidance of the use of synergistic medications, intervention, and outcomes for critically ill patients.

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