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Peer-Reviewed Critical Care Nursing Journal

Article Listings - 1984 to Present

Assessing the impact of creating virtual windows on the incidence of delirium in a surgical intensive care unit: a before and after study

Abstract

Introduction: Delirium is a frequent and important problem in the intensive care unit (ICU), and non-pharmacological means of prevention are limited. The importance of the physical environment in the occurrence of delirium in intensive care has been reported, particularly the presence of windows and daylight. We organized a trial to evaluate if the installation of virtual windows in the form of paintings in rooms without an actual window can limit the occurrence of delirium in ICU patients.

Revising the Canadian Association of Critical Care Nurses Standards for Critical Care Nursing Practice: A Modified Delphi Protocol

Abstract

Background: Since 1992, the Canadian Association of Critical Care Nurses (CACCN) has set the Standards of Practice for Canadian critical care nurses. The current Standards were revised in 2017, after undergoing the fifth review since inception. The Association’s practice has been to review the Standards approximately every five years.

Aim: The aim of this protocol is to provide a transparent and replicable process for Standards revision.

Identifying Opportunities for Antimicrobial Stewardship in a Tertiary Intensive Care Unit: A Qualitative Study

Abstract

Background: Antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) encompasses numerous interventions that seek to improve antimicrobial usage, as inappropriate use of antimicrobials may result in the promotion of antimicrobial resistance, patient harm, and increased costs. AMS is of particular interest in intensive care units (ICUs) where antimicrobial use is extensive. Few qualitative studies have sought to identify the perceived attitudes and beliefs of intensive care clinicians around AMS.

Objectives: To understand ICU nursing and physician priorities and preferences around AMS and possible AMS interventions for implementation in the ICU.

A Feminist Perspective on Post-Pandemic Burnout in Critical Care Nurses

Historically, nursing has been a gendered profession. Still today, women dominate the nursing landscape. In 2019, the Canadian Nurses Association reported that 91% of Registered Nurses were female in Canada (Canadian Nurses Association, 2019, p.1). Given this strong female presence, it is disconcerting that nursing remains inequitable for women in 2023. Feminist theory explores the importance of women’s perspectives, social justice, and feminist values, providing the theoretical and philosophical groundwork for the progression of gender equality (Im &

A rapid realist review of practices for assigning remote telemetry responsibilities to new critical care nurses

Abstract

Background: Registered nurses in critical care units may have a variety of responsibilities in addition to direct patient care. Assuming roles over and above their patient assignment can be challenging for nurses new to critical care. Even though additional roles may include similar skill sets (e.g., electrocardiography), the demands of learning multiple new roles and responsibilities occur during a larger transition into specialty practice.

Aim: To identify and summarize literature that helps provide guidance and best-practice(s) regarding assigning telemetry to new critical care nurses.

“We were treading water.” Experiences of healthcare providers in Canadian ICUs during COVID-19 visitor restrictions: A qualitative descriptive study.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To explore and describe the impact of COVID-19 restrictive visitation policies on healthcare providers (HCPs) and to identify ongoing challenges and pragmatic solutions that could inform recommendations for patient and family-centered care (PFCC) in the ICU during pandemic conditions. 

Methods: We conducted a qualitative descriptive study within a constructivist paradigm. We used two sources of data collected simultaneously: semi-structured interviews conducted remotely via video or phone and written comments gathered through open-ended response boxes in a questionnaire to explore the perspectives of HCPs working in Canadian ICUs during visitor restrictions resulting from the first wave of COVID-19.

Barriers and facilitators in the provision of palliative care in critical care: A qualitative descriptive study of nurses’ perspectives

Intensive care units are providing increasing amounts of palliative care. Accordingly, integrating palliative care as a component of comprehensive critical care has been identified as a necessity. The purpose of this study was to explore what critical care nurses perceive as barriers and facilitators in the provision of palliative care in the critical care setting.

Virtual reality as an adjunctive comfort measure in the intensive care and coronary care unit: A nurse-led quality improvement project

Abstract

Background:  Pain, discomfort, and anxiety in critical care units are complex, multifaceted experiences. Nurse-led implementations of adjunctive comfort measures in critical care settings are essential components in the holistic management of these experiences. Virtual reality is gaining popularity as an adjunctive comfort measure across acute care settings to promote patient comfort, though there is limited evidence examining the utility of virtual reality in critical care.

Purpose: Firstly,

A call for standardized national guidelines on QT/QTc monitoring in Canada

Background: With QT-prolonging drugs being trialed for the treatment of COVID-19, national health associations allude to the importance of proficient QT interval assessment, however in Canada, there is no policy in place that clearly identifies a single method for routine QT monitoring.

Aim: To demonstrate the need for a clear Canadian guideline for the measurement of the QT/QTc interval and to advocate for a standardized approach to education.

Methods: This paper uses a medical anthropological approach to scale this practice gap from the individual provider to the institutions which govern practice and education.Nurses and emergency medical personnel from hospitals across Canada were polled with questionnaires on their confidence and knowledge of assessing the QT/QTc interval.

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